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Miniature Daffodils

Daffodil varieties are classified into 13 divisions, beginning with Trumpets and ending with what might be called the species (daffodils encountered in the wild). Missing from the list is Miniatures. Height and flower size are not considered when assigning a variety to a division. A daffodil that meets the criterion for being, say, a trumpet or a jonquil, is so labeled, even if it’s only 6 inches tall.

Since there is no division for Miniatures, there is no official definition of “miniature” among daffodils. The American Daffodil Society, which prides itself on establishing guidelines and making fine distinctions, has tried in the past to arrive at a definition but so far has been unable to arrive at a consensus.

In this vacuum, Colorblends offers its own list of miniatures. They bear relatively small flowers on proportionately smaller plants, but all are very big in the cuteness category.

Daffodil varieties are classified into 13 divisions, beginning with Trumpets and ending with what might be called the species (daffodils encountered in the wild). Missing from the list is Miniatures. Height and flower size are not considered when assigning a variety to a division. A daffodil that meets the criterion for being, say, a trumpet or a jonquil, is so labeled, even if it’s only 6 inches tall.

Since there is no division for Miniatures, there is no official definition of “miniature” among daffodils. The American Daffodil Society, which prides itself on establishing guidelines and making fine distinctions, has tried in the past to arrive at a definition but so far has been unable to arrive at a consensus.

In this vacuum, Colorblends offers its own list of miniatures. They bear relatively small flowers on proportionately smaller plants, but all are very big in the cuteness category.