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Gold Standard Daffodils

Carlton

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Carlton LS

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Every year, Colorblends receives many requests for a yellow trumpet daffodil named King Alfred. King Alfred represented a breakthrough in breeding when it was introduced at the tail end of the 19th century, and it eventually became so popular that its name is now synonymous with “big early yellow daffodil.” Today, though, only a handful of true King Alfred bulbs are grown commercially—at a price that only a collector would want to pay.

The good news is that there are alternatives to King Alfred. Like the King, they make large, showy flowers in early spring, when the winter-weary are desperately in need of a pick-me-up, but the bulbs are available at a price that pretty much anyone can afford. These varieties, shown here, are the current gold standard-bearers.

Marieke

Sold Out

Every year, Colorblends receives many requests for a yellow trumpet daffodil named King Alfred. King Alfred represented a breakthrough in breeding when it was introduced at the tail end of the 19th century, and it eventually became so popular that its name is now synonymous with “big early yellow daffodil.” Today, though, only a handful of true King Alfred bulbs are grown commercially—at a price that only a collector would want to pay.

The good news is that there are alternatives to King Alfred. Like the King, they make large, showy flowers in early spring, when the winter-weary are desperately in need of a pick-me-up, but the bulbs are available at a price that pretty much anyone can afford. These varieties, shown here, are the current gold standard-bearers.

We still have bulbs! See our Current Availability